How Telfar defeated bots

Although most brands haven’t found (or haven’t looked for) a solution to these hoarding bots, the accessible luxury brand, Telfar by Telfar Clemens has done it and done it well.

Telfar shopping bags
When bots took over accessible fashion brand, Telfar’s site, CEO Telfar Clemens built a system adamant on making sure it never happens again.

Resellers and bots have had what feels like an irreversible effect on retail, buying out popular pieces before the average consumer and reselling for over double the retail price. Although most brands haven’t found (or haven’t looked for) a solution to these hoarding bots, the accessible luxury brand, Telfar by Telfar Clemens has done it and done it well.

Telfar (also known as the Bushwick Birkin) has taken over the spotlight in the last few years particularly for its affordable leather ‘shopping bags’ that come in 20 stunning colours. In the last year, they have collaborated with converse on 2 pairs of Chuck 70 High tops as well as UGG on fur-lined versions of their classic ‘shopping bag’ silhouette and it doesn’t stop there, they have released limited collections with Pat McGrath, Supreme, Demon Slayer and UNIQLO. But why the sudden interest in the brand? Its genderless, affordable, black-owned and accessible, there’s nothing like it on the market making it perfect prey for resellers.

Clemens has created a new industry standard, when brands have this level of hype around them they tend to drop limited stock to keep the pieces in demand but Telfar has gone in a completely different direction. After hearing customers were discouraged when trying to beat the bots, Telfar created the Telfar Security Program which gave customers 24hrs to pre-order all the bags they want as well as restocking one product a week. With all this, the demand hasn’t dropped and Telfar remains one of the most popular luxury bags. They’ve been seen on the shoulders of celebs everywhere including Solange, Selena Gomez, Bella Hadid, A$AP Ferg and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Some are worried that the attainability of the brand will make it too mainstream and barely luxury but personally, I am not worried, as long as we continue to support black designers, Telfar will always hold its place in the market.

Written by Caitlin Coughlan-Léon