Bloodhound is the new unisex brand you need on your radar

Bloodhound is a new ethical unisex casual-wear brand, with a vision for inclusivity and timelessness. We’ve spoken to brand director Adam Bennett, to find out more about the brand and what it’s like to create a business.

Bloodhound strives to create designs made for everyone- why was it important to launch an inclusive brand?

Inclusivity was never a question for us. From the very outset, making clothes that could be worn by as many people as possible was at the core of our mission.  I’m definitely proud that our customer base so far has been so diverse and want to make sure that remains at the heart of what we do going forward.

“Inclusivity was never a question for us.”

How do your design teams work to respond to emerging trends whilst still focusing on timeless style?

I think that focus on timelessness is really important. Sometimes it’s easy to see pieces from other brands or current trends do really well and be tempted to jump on the bandwagon and release something similar. However, I think that simple, staple pieces can never get old and I believe this is what Bloodhound will always be about.

What sets Bloodhound apart from other ethical fashion brands?

We strive to make pieces that compete with big brands not through the fact that they’re ethically made but because they look and feel great. I think sometimes it can be disheartening to shop ethically because you feel like you have to compromise on something; be that price, design, or convenience and we really want Bloodhound to avoid this trap. Hopefully our customers are drawn to us by a desire to wear our products because they like the look and fit of them rather than strictly out of a commitment to finding something that doesn’t harm the planet or its people.

“We strive to make pieces that compete with big brands not through the fact that they’re ethically made but because they look and feel great.”

What was the eureka moment for launching the label?

I was indecisive for months about launching the business, I think mainly out of nervousness and a lack of confidence. As simple as it sounds I think the biggest eureka moment was when I finally decided to stop second guessing myself and just commit. Once I decided I was really going for it and made a few decisions in line with that commitment, everything started to pick up speed and became really exciting.

“The biggest eureka moment was when I finally decided to stop second guessing myself”

How did you come up with the name Bloodhound?

It’s a name I have thought of as cool for a long time; even way before setting up a clothing brand was really on my radar. I played with a few different names when I was thinking about starting a clothing line but once I remembered Bloodhound I knew I wanted to run with that.

What does the Bloodhound customer stand for?

Hopefully all sorts of different things! I love that we’ve had such a variety of people buying our clothes so far and hope that diversity never stops. I would say that I hope all of our customers appreciate that ethical shopping is the only future. We cannot view this as a trendy thing to do or a passing fad; it is absolutely vital.

“I love that we’ve had such a variety of people buying our clothes so far and hope that diversity never stops.”

Does influencer marketing play a part in creating outreach for Bloodhound?

Influencer marketing does play a part to an extent but we are very cautious with it. I think influencer culture has the potential to be dangerous and harmful at times and I would hate to play a part in that. As a result we are very selective with who we choose to work with and constantly evaluate our partnerships. I also think that influencer marketing is sometimes overestimated and that with the rapid boom in the number of influencers its impact has weakened as people grow wary of contrived and artificial social media marketing ploys. We want anyone who promotes our products to actually have a relationship with the brand and to enjoy wearing our clothes. 

What should we look out for next from the brand?

We want to make more simple but stunning pieces that go with almost any outfit and don’t cost an arm and a leg. We currently have a couple of designs that we are super excited about and that I think will show real progression in our design abilities while staying true to our roots. Of course, we’ll also never compromise on the ethical side of what we do. 

“We want to make more simple but stunning pieces that go with almost any outfit and don’t cost an arm and a leg.”

Fashion brands are seeing value in returning to bricks and mortar with stand alone stores, concessions and pop ups. Is this something you’d venture into?

Pop ups and concessions are something that excite me almost more than anything else. The idea of seeing our products in stores and giving customers the opportunity to form that physical connection with the pieces is incredible. At the moment the costs and practical demands of brick and mortar retail are too high for us but it’s certainly something that really motivates me and as soon as we get the opportunity I think we’ll jump on it. 

Written by Sophie Corderoy, Photos from Bloodhound